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I am trying to get my girlfriend into the occasional hunt with me and to start shooting clays also. She is actually a naturally good shot and didn't take too much work for her to starting hitting consistantly. I have been wrestling with what gun to get for her use. I would like to get one that the recoil is almost nonexsistant. She shoots her dads 1100 20ga and complains a little bit about the recoil after awhile. I was wondering if there was a better option for her. Maybe a 28ga or 410 but I think the 410 would just make it harder for her to hit the clays. If anybody has some advice I am willing to listen
 

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Get a gun that FITS!!! People with recoil problems are often shoting guns that do not fit

Frank
 

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A lot of men do not understand the many (but not all) women have a different tolerance to recoil then the majority of men. A generalization but it is often the case.

It took me years to fully grasp this.

petrey10 said:
She shoots her dads 1100 20ga and complains a little bit about the recoil after awhile. I was wondering if there was a better option for her. Maybe a 28ga or 410 but I think the 410 would just make it harder for her to hit the clays. If anybody has some advice I am willing to listen
When the Remington Shooting School was operating, you could bring your own guns but the school guns were various 12g's and the then-new 1100 Sporting 28.

The use of the 28g precluded 12g/20g mix-ups but they also found the 28g 1100 was effective enough to teach new shooters skeet and sporting clays, with negligable recoil discomfort.

IF the 28g is effective enough for the type of shooting you get into and you don't mind the cost of the shells, it might be worth looking into.

My wife ordered an 1100 Sporting 28 in 1995 after attending the school and it is one of her favorites; to me, it is vertually recoiless.
 

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I have a lady friend who shoots skeet occasionally and uses an 1100 sporting 28 gauge. I shot it recently and the LOP was too short but the recoil was non-existent. I highly recommend it for women, maybe if I get one, I will get my wife to try it. I think I just talked myself into a trip to gunsamerica....
 

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The 28 gauge Franchi 48 AL auto loading would be a good choice for her.The 28 gauge 48 AL is light about 5 1/2 pounds and in the 28 gauge has almost no recoil.I have two 28 gauge 48 AL's that I use hunting.They are very dependable working shotguns.A fine choice for any shorgunner.
 

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I would get her a gas operated gun in either 20 ga or 28 ga. My friend bought his wife an 11-87 20 ga recently. It is a bit on the heavy side and to me has almost no recoil.
 

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My wife is easily bruised and loves her Browning Gold Ladies Sporting model. She can do a full clays match without difficulty. I do load 1 OZ loads for her, but they are not light 1 Oz loads.
 

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My Mom won several AAA, all bore, combined club championships shooting an M11 28g gun. She was able to beat all the guys, with their 12g guns, and I bet she had a great time doing it, and bet they HATED IT. :lol:

28g, is a very, very good load, and can be loaded for less money than 12g if you can find a stash of AA-HS hulls. If I can't fix the issues with my 20g tubes, I will likely be shooting the 28g for everything but the 410.

A 28g auto or O/U would be a great gun for her.

bd
 

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Gun fit and weight (more importantly how its distributed) are the most important factors in picking what gauge gun would be best. The poorer the fit the more likely one will need a "smaller" gauge as it recoils less. I attended the Remington School on two occasions and noticed that the use of 7400/7600 rifle stocks to be commonplace on guns for women. I asked and was told this brought the comb up much higher which was a better fit for most women and reduced the amount of face slap they would receive. As also mentioned, the weight of the gun can be a factor as a too heavy or poorly balanced gun can cause the woman to tire faster and that the affects their stance and posture which then can transmit recoil unpleasantly.
In the women's clinics I regularly help teach at, most women use 12 ga guns. With a little time spent adjusting the stock and some education on shell choice, few of the women change to something else. The Winchester AA X-tra Lites and similar 1 oz, 2 3/4 dram loads are pretty easy shooting and easily found. Today there are even a number of 7/8 oz loads in the 12 ga that are even easier on the shoulder. My wife started with an old 20 ga Rem 870 built on the 12 ga frame and hated it. She kept complaining of the "heavy recoil" even with 1/2 oz reloads. I finally realized it was the weight and balance of the gun and not the load choice and switched to a gun that was lighter up front. Now she finds a 12 ga Beretta 391 with a 30" barrel to fit her style very well for targets and my 20 ga Beretta 390 to be a better upland gun. A switch to a smaller gauge does not necessarily mean less recoil as the smaller guns often weigh less and still do not fit very well. Realizing the fact there are major physical differences between women and men and taking steps to alleviate them will go far towards making shooting a more pleasant experience.
So first off, get a gun or adjust one to get a reasonably close fit. If you don't know how to do this, find an instructor who can help. Then get the gun to balance comfortably for her. It may mean a different gun or it may mean adjusting the weight with some some lead or a rasp.
 

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I like the above post.

My suggestion is to check fit first. Get it fitted to her--by a GOOD fitter, or even a GREAT one. Then have her shoot it some. If it's still just the plain thump of the gun that is getting her, then the 28ga 1100 is my next suggestion.

Good luck!

I wish my wife would shoot....
 

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Fit first. Then, as uglydog suggests, a slower lighter load in the gun of choice. A 7/8 oz load through a 7 1/2 lb 12 ga gun will have correspondinly mild recoil. A 28 ga gun shooting a 3/4 oz load and weighing 6 1/2 lb would have about the same. The ratio of the weight of the gun to the shot charge foe both of these combinations is greater than 135, which is what I also prefer for myself. The 1100 with a youth stock in 28 ga was my own solution to the problem of recoil for the missus - very mild indeed. Those who shoot the 28 will often claim the gun hits harder and more effectively than they had expected. All the best in your quest.
 

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A youth 20 gauge semi auto would be a good choice. There are a few good ones around that don't cost a ton. All of these come with shims or have them available to adjust the fit of the gun.

Beretta AL391 Youth: This model is very thin and pretty light in weight at around 5.9 lbs. They balance with more weight towards the stock. They are Gas operated, have 3" chambers, and cycle a wide range of shells. They have an automatic magazine cutoff and a bolt lock lever. They also come with shims to adjust the fit of the stock. They are more complicated to clean compared to other models. They do go long periods between cleanings if needed. Price wise they are around $800.00.

Beretta 3901 RL: This model is wider than the AL391. They weigh around 6.5 lbs. They balance with more weight towards the stock. They are Gas operated, have 3" chambers, and cycle a wide range of shells. They have an automatic magazine cutoff but, no bolt lock lever. They also come with shims to adjust the fit of the stock. They are pretty easy to clean and can go long periods between cleanings if needed. They hold a total of four rounds and can't take an extension to hold more. The safety button is at the back of the trigger guard. Price wise they are around $650.00.

Browning Gold SL Micro: This model is similar in size to the 3901. They weigh around 6.25 lbs and balances with more weight towards the stock. They are Gas operated, have 3" chambers, and cycle a wide range of shells. This model has the speed load feature. They have shims available to adjust the stock. They are very easy to clean and can go long periods between cleanings. They hold five rounds total and can take an extension to hold more. The safety button is at the back of the trigger guard. Price wise they are around $750.00 and Browning has a $100.00 rebate on Golds.

Browning Silver Micro is new for 08'. It's a similar to the Gold but cost less. It weighs about 6.3 lbs. They don't have the speed load feature of the Gold and have an angled receiver. They sell for around $650.00

Franchi 720 Short Stock: This model is thinner like the AL391. It weighs about 5.8 lbs and balances with more weight towards the stock. They are Gas operated, have 3" chambers, and cycle a wide range of shells. This model has an automatic magazine cutoff. It's piston can be flipped around to allow more bleed of for heavier loads. They have shims to adjust the stock. They are one of the easier semi auto models to clean and can go long periods between cleanings. They hold five rounds total and can take an extension to hold more. The safety is at the back of the trigger guard. Price wise they are around $600.00

A good fitting 20 gauge semi shooting lighter loads will go a long way in reducing felt recoil.
 
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