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this past summer i was looking at buying a beretta blackwing. well that didn't work out but i did get a great deal on a ruger red label 20 gauge. i'm thinking about getting some briley tubes for it. i haven't had any experience with these. right now i'm just looking for some for hunting ,or is this silly and should i stay with the factory tubes that i have? in the future though i would like to get some tubes for the 20 gauge trap night we have at my range. any opinions would be helpful. what kind ,what length, ported? any thing would help.
 

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Extended chokes are easier to tell what choke you have in the gun. Other than that it is your preference. You NEED to pattern the gun to find out if you even need or want to bother with aftermarket chokes.
 
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I talked to a rep. at Ruger a couple of weeks ago and he said that he thought all the tubes in the Red Label guns were built by Briley. In another post on this site, it is stated that in the 12ga. guns, the late Rugers have Briley tubes but the early ones have Invector tubes. So you may have Briley tubes. In the 12 ga. guns, the early guns take different chokes than the later ones - I do not know if this is the case with the 20 ga.

On the Ruger website you can find your serial num. and when your gun was built. I think it is under Product Service.

http://www.ruger.com/Firearms/SE-H-Shotgun.html

Ex.Tubes are supposed to throw better patterns because they choke the shot over a longer distance, and distort it less. The only semi-reliable source that I have talked to about this, said that they might be good for about two more clays out of 50.

You might keep an eye out for some used tubes - talk to people at your local club. I was able to pick up a set of seven extended chokes for $100.[/url]
 

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"What kind of choke tubes should you buy?"

Well, I would recommend metal tubes that are threaded on the outside and have a hole in each end. :lol: Other than that, it won't make a heck of a lot of difference. In fact, unless you have patterned your present tubes, you don't know if you need new tubes or not (unless you happen to be missing some tubes).

For hunting or for clays shooting, you need tubes for 3 type shots... Close Range, Medium Range, and Long Range. Anything more than that is superfluous. (That means unnecessary or excessive in case you don't want to look it up.) :wink:

Ported tubes? NO

Extended tubes? Probably not, unless you are going to be changing tubes after every few shots. I have some extended tubes and they don't shoot any better patterns (and maybe not as good) as the flush tubes in the same gun. Their one main advantage is that they are quicker to change and you can tell at a glance what choke is in the barrel.

Save your money for ammo, target practice, and perhaps a few lessons.
 

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I'm not a player of the formal clays games, so I'll defer to Ulysses. But one minor addition-- if you have screw-in chokes you need one rated for steel or hevi-shot if you want the max for ducks, turkeys, and geese. Not all of these screw in chokes are up to the specs (but most are). Generally, Hevi-shot says that if a choke will shoot steel, it'll be ok with hevi. That said, I'm hunting this year with my 1951 Ithaca 37, 28" barrel, fixed modified choke. I expect I can make it work for everything from quail to deer, just need an extra bit of practice, as Ulysses, true to his screen name, so wisely counsels. For me, it's Bismuth for waterfowl, long-range loads for turkey, and soft Foster slugs for deer. You MIGHT consider a rifled choke for deer, if you don't have a rifled replacement barrel. Calling and scouting technique is more important anyhow. Clays are another matter altogether!

Jeff23
 
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