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I would recomend a beam scale. The electronics are too finiky and can be downright inaccurate if not watched carefully.

Most all reloading equipment offer them and most all are made by Ohaus, which is the largest scale maker in the world. Very accurate. I would suggest any of the models by RCBS, Hornady, Redding, Lyman, or Dillon. The Dillon beam scale has about the best price, and is a good scale.

Avoid the plastic scale made by Lee. A few will swear by them, but most will only swear at them. IMHO they are just cheap junk. Lee makes some fine reloading tools, but that scale isn't one of their better ideas.

DLM
 

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D L Marcum said:
I would recomend a beam scale. The electronics are too finiky and can be downright inaccurate if not watched carefully.

Most all reloading equipment offer them and most all are made by Ohaus, which is the largest scale maker in the world. Very accurate. I would suggest any of the models by RCBS, Hornady, Redding, Lyman, or Dillon. The Dillon beam scale has about the best price, and is a good scale.

Avoid the plastic scale made by Lee. A few will swear by them, but most will only swear at them. IMHO they are just cheap junk. Lee makes some fine reloading tools, but that scale isn't one of their better ideas.

DLM
+1 to DLM, I am going through Pure He$$ with RCBS on a electronic Scale and i wish I would have spent the Money for a non battery operated no plug in Beam scale. I will not make the same mistake again.
 

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I have both an old beam scale and a newer ( although 8 or 10 yrs old now ) digital scale.

There isn't anything wrong with the digital scales / you just need to let them warm up a little beforehand. Newbie or experienced loaders - really makes no difference - we both need accurate scales so we can adjust our presses properly. Either a beam or digital scale will work - just buy a name brand - Dillon, RCBS, Hornady, etc
 

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I use a beam and have for years. :)
I've wanted an electronic but have never made the plunge. :roll: I would want a set of check weights with an electronic.
 

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I vote beam scale. In reloading you really are not trying to determine the weight of something - you are trying to check that your powder drops are both consistent, and what you want. The beam scale is very good for this. It goes without saying though - you get what you pay for - the scale is an important part of your reloading gear and will last for years and years properly cared for - get a good one.

OTOH if you need to be able to sort brass by weights - or weigh a bunch of shells to see if there are any variations - a digital is better suited for this. I don't own a digital - I borrow one the once in a great while I feel like I need one. I had a bunch of suspect .410 rounds once, I used a digital to sort them out from heaviest to lightest, grouped them and then shot them. ended up being very few shells were actually bad.

John
 

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++ on DLM's comments.

I use the Dillon 'Eliminator' and am completely satisfied with it.
 

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I've had very good luck with a PACT. Comes with check weights and is easy to zero.
 

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Get a beam (RCBS 5-0-2 is all you'll ever need). Basic, simple, reliable for as long as you own it. No warm-up, no zero, no fiddling around.
 

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The best scale for a Newbie?

RCBS 5-0-5

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I've used the Dillon beam scale for some time before I purchased a new electronic scale. It's very easy to use and if you move to an electric one later you can check your loads against the beam scale once in a while just to make sure. The nice thing about electrics is you can set the tare for the shell weight and weigh multiple drops quickly.
 

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I own both a beam (Redding) and electronic (RCBS) scale. My beam scale gathers dust while I use my electronic scale all the time. The RCBS is so much faster and convenient (and just as accurate).
 

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Over the years I have had a half dozen or so beam scales up to a couple of RCBS 1010's. I now own three electronic scales (older Dillon, older Pact & new RCBS Chargemaster) and no beam scales. I have the Pact on my metallic loading bench and just leave it on all the time. The Dillon is on my shot shell loading bench. All of these come with check weights and I never had a lick of trouble with any of them. To me, using a beam scale compared to a electronic one is like using a typewriter compared to a word processer.
Charlie
 

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Electronic for me also. I have checked it against a beam scale when I first started using it and it is right on. Beam scales are almost non existant in commercial use which should tell you something.
 

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laportecharlie said:
Over the years I have had a half dozen or so beam scales up to a couple of RCBS 1010's. I now own three electronic scales (older Dillon, older Pact & new RCBS Chargemaster) and no beam scales. I have the Pact on my metallic loading bench and just leave it on all the time. The Dillon is on my shot shell loading bench. All of these come with check weights and I never had a lick of trouble with any of them. To me, using a beam scale compared to a electronic one is like using a typewriter compared to a word processer.
Charlie
Here, here! I started out with a beam scale but quickly went to a digital. For a new shotshell reloader, just getting their feet wet and deciding if the really want to do it, I highly recommend the MTM digital scale that can be had for about $25.00. I have been using one for about a year now and am getting close to upgrading to a nicer digital. My only real gripe with the MTM is that the little coin size batteries it uses are expensive and only last me through 3 or 4 months of reloading. I get very consistent loads using the MTM and have been very happy with mine.
 

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beammeupscotty said:
To me, using a beam scale compared to a electronic one is like using a typewriter compared to a word processer.
Exactly right... when's the last time your typewriter got a virus or experienced a software glitch? Technology doesn't always bring improvement, and there are plenty of unreliable, inconsistent digi-scales on the market to prove that.

Since we have no control over what brand/type/quality digi-scale a new reloader might buy, better to steer them toward something that's proven fool-proof now and let them decide if they want to change paths later.
 

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beammeupscotty said:
laportecharlie said:
Over the years I have had a half dozen or so beam scales up to a couple of RCBS 1010's. I now own three electronic scales (older Dillon, older Pact & new RCBS Chargemaster) and no beam scales. I have the Pact on my metallic loading bench and just leave it on all the time. The Dillon is on my shot shell loading bench. All of these come with check weights and I never had a lick of trouble with any of them. To me, using a beam scale compared to a electronic one is like using a typewriter compared to a word processer.
Charlie
Here, here! I started out with a beam scale but quickly went to a digital. For a new shotshell reloader, just getting their feet wet and deciding if the really want to do it, I highly recommend the MTM digital scale that can be had for about $25.00. I have been using one for about a year now and am getting close to upgrading to a nicer digital. My only real gripe with the MTM is that the little coin size batteries it uses are expensive and only last me through 3 or 4 months of reloading. I get very consistent loads using the MTM and have been very happy with mine.
How do you know your getting "Very consistent" Loads with a $25.00 dollar scale? Just curious?
 

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Dean, if you are smart, you get a set of test weights. And that applies to both beam scales and electronic. Now how many people with beam scales have test weights? Most of the electronics come with them. Some people will use a lead bullet as a test weight but they can be all over the place.

I have two good balance scales and they gather dust. When I am checking powder or lead drops I use a tared pan on the scale and run 10 drops and add them individually to the pan so I can get an individual drop for each and not even have to take the powder out of the pan. It is quick and simple and the electonic is easy to calibrate, I just put my test weight on it and press calibrate. I may find a use for my old balance scales but I can't imagine what for.
 
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