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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've looked around on the web and don't see any definite answers on this question; most of the guidance tell you not to load your gun until you are on the line. Well, gee whiz, I know that.
My question is more specific: Once I am on the line, when can I chamber a round (in my semiauto) with respect to my position among the other shooters? For example, let's say I am on station 4. Can I hit the bolt release and chamber a round after #2 has shot, to get that process out of the way? (While of course keeping the gun in an outward facing safe direction.) Or do I have to wait until after #3 has shot before I hit the bolt release?
Not sure there is a hard and fast rule (I can't seem to find one), so I am just asking.
Thanks
 

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Wait, be patient. You close your action when #3 has shot and it's your turn. It only takes a 1/2 second to close the action. After #3 shoots, close the action as you raise your shotgun to your hold point and call for the bird. There's no need to speed it up any more than that.
 

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At a registered shoot (ATA, PITA) you may load and/or close your gun whenever you want, while you are on station. Change stations with an open and unloaded gun. Local range rules may apply at other times.
 

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If you are on station 4 close your action when station 2 fires their round. If you do this you will not interrupt the momentum of the squad and you will not set off an unwanted target when the bolt closes. Oregunner gives correct information regarding registered shooting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you all. Let me make absolutely sure that my definition of "pointed in a safe direction" is correct in this instance. My definition would be that the gun is (obviously) pointed downrange, toward the house, but that as long as it's pointed roughly 45 degrees or so (basically into the grass), I am ok. In other words, I don't have to be holding the gun horizontally when I chamber the round, correct?
Seems obvious to me, but I thought I might as well ask. I'm less concerned about being unsafe (because I am pretty sure I know how to be safe) than in pissing someone off or getting someone nervous when they hear the chamber close.
In other words, just use common sense and good judgment.
Maybe a dumb question, but I normally shoot alone (mostly skeet shooters where I go), so I thought I would check.
Thanks again.
 

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At registered trap shoots, shooters with breakopen guns will rest their barrel on a pad, or their shoe, with a round in the chamber, but the action is open. If the action of any gun is closed, it should be pointed in some direction downrange. The grass is fine.
 

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When I shoot trap, I put a round in the chamber right after I shoot but don't close the gun until the shooter to my left has shot unless it's the last shot on that station. I haven't been yelled at or chewed out by the referee yet.
I think most voice activated trap releases have a built in time delay so the expletive you shout after missing a bird doesn't throw another bird, or more likely so people can't call for a bird before the trap has reset. It also will let you release the bolt of an auto loader if you do it right after the shooter to the left has shot.
 

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I was taught (circa 1980) not to close my gun until it was my turn to shoot...but that was before the advent of microphones. Today, I shoot a break-open and still will not close the action until it's my turn, but if I shot a semi, I'd prolly close it when the shooter to my left called for his/her target.
 

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Wait till it's your turn............forget about the other guys and breaking the rhythm of the other shooters.You shoot to the beat of your own drum or your own timing.
Anything prior to loading before your turn could possibly cause danger, in my opinion.
Salesrep
 

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for me I load a round into the chamber 2 shooters before me and close the action during the time delay after the shot before me, this is how I was taught when I joined the club.
 

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salesrep1 said:
Wait till it's your turn............forget about the other guys and breaking the rhythm of the other shooters.You shoot to the beat of your own drum or your own timing.
Anything prior to loading before your turn could possibly cause danger, in my opinion.
Salesrep
Agreed. Your "rhythm" begins when it's your turn to shoot, you don't owe it to the rest of the squad to shoot before you are ready.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
BLE and Salesrep - You write that "you don't owe it to the rest of the squad to shoot before you are ready" and not to worry about breaking the rhythm of the other shooters. I like that advice and will take it going forward. Very helpful advice.
However, I seem to recall hearing or reading somewhere that there is some informal "guidance" in trapshooting that you aren't supposed to take more than 15 seconds (or some such amount) of time after the previous shooter, before you shoot, so that you don't slow the rhythm of the squad.
Like I said, I am going to take your advice and am going to start taking my time (within reason, of course). But I do know that some shooters get antsy about waiting too long. (And when I identify those shooters, I avoid them.)
Just curious if any of you have ever heard of this "guidance" or informal rule of the game. I know there are a lot of "experts" out there that tout all sorts of rules and regulations, so I thought I would ask.
Thanks
 

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Do what you want to, as long as it is safe. If you find yourself shooting by yourself, you might consider watching the veteran shooters, to see what the norm is. Trap has been shot for over 100 years, and there is an etiquette involved. Just be safe, and don't act stupid. There are different expectations shooting practice, compared to shooting at an event.
 

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gunsrfun1 said:
BLE and Salesrep - You write that "you don't owe it to the rest of the squad to shoot before you are ready" and not to worry about breaking the rhythm of the other shooters. I like that advice and will take it going forward. Very helpful advice.
However, I seem to recall hearing or reading somewhere that there is some informal "guidance" in trapshooting that you aren't supposed to take more than 15 seconds (or some such amount) of time after the previous shooter, before you shoot, so that you don't slow the rhythm of the squad.
Like I said, I am going to take your advice and am going to start taking my time (within reason, of course). But I do know that some shooters get antsy about waiting too long. (And when I identify those shooters, I avoid them.)
Just curious if any of you have ever heard of this "guidance" or informal rule of the game. I know there are a lot of "experts" out there that tout all sorts of rules and regulations, so I thought I would ask.
Thanks
Fifteen seconds is a long time, you're talking about a quarter of a minute here, time it on a clock with a second hand and see how long 15 seconds really is.
What I mean is that if your gun is not mounted correctly, don't shoot anyway just because you feel pressure to shoot as fast as the rest of the squad.
After the person before me has shot, I close the gun, mount it on my shoulder, check for correct mounting (stack the beads) and then make sure my eyes are focused out there before calling for the bird. It takes nowhere near 15 seconds, maybe two or three seconds, five at the most.
If shooting just a second or so slower than the other shooters throws off their rhythm, what happens when someone has a gun malfunction or gets thrown a no-bird? Is your shooting rhythm totally off if you shoot with a 4 or 3 man squad?

Yea, I can see nobody wanting to squad with you if you have endless gun malfunctions or regularly have a blooper in your reloads that require barrel clearing, or you take a ridiculous amount of time to do your shot, practice swings and so forth.
 

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Oh boy how I remember the 'squad rhythm' back in the 80's when I shot trap. It usually occurred during team shoots in the winter and the teams that shot with good rhythm usually were the high scorers. If you didn't keep the pace you were shuffled to a lower scoring team. I'm in no way saying it was right but it was something that was done back then,, in my experience anyway.
 
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