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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy fellers!
I have an older 1100 in 20 Ga. with stock and forend that don't really match in color. The forend appears to have a reddish hue rather than the buttstock's typical walnut coloration. I do know that the gun had been in a closet(I'm assuming barrel up) during a housefire that did cause some smoke damage that I was able to remove before replacing the barrel w/ a NIB skeet barrel w/ a vent-rib from Don Corson. I know it's all original as the original owner's son is the gent who bestowed this family heirloom on me. How do I go about refinishing the furniture w/o destroying the grip cap which is a fixed piece. I believe the checkering is pressed from what one refinisher in Texas has told me. I plan to cut this piece to my wife's LOP and install a GTF Limbsaver upon completion of this project.
My main questions are:
A- Is this something I can accomplish myself? &
B- Where do I start?
C- Would I be better off trying to refinish the forend ONLY to match the buttstock? This would seem to be a crapshoot trying to match colors from one piece to another w/o the common starting point of mutaually raw wood from which to start.
I've refinished alot of household furniture in my day and always employed chemical means to remove original frinishes. I'm fine with doing so here; but don't want to ruin the grip cap which appears to be epoxyed in place at the factory.
It's the second from the top in the attached photo.
Thanks for any and all help you guys can afford me hereabouts!
BB

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
You've gotta be kidding me!? Not one of you guys can steer me in the right direction on this project?
Don't tell me I'm gonna have to reach out to LeverGuns.com or MarlinOwners.com to figure out how to refinish the wood on a SHOTGUN!
Somebody's gotta have an idea how to go about doing this w/o ruining the grip cap. I'm considering buying some Formby's Furniture Refinisher to strip just the forend and then reseal it in the hopes that it'll match the buttstock better than currently.
Any thoughts? PLEASE!
Help me respective Obi Wans! It's not like you're my only hope; but I'd rather ask you guys than my friends on the lever action forums I frequent.
BB

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What do you mean the cap is "fixed" ? If it man put it on , man can remove it. If it has no mechanical device (screws) holding it on it must be attached by an adhesive. Is it metal or plastic?
There may be a screw in the center underneath a black sticker
(saw this on a winchester). If it is held on with epoxy, or another adhesive, try a heat gun. My only concern there would be if it's plastic it might soften before the epoxy. If it's metal no problem. I looked on Nmrich's site and the show the cap for
$ 3.80 new, and a cap spacer that is out of stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yo shotgunne,
Thanks for helping. No mechanical means of attachment means adhesive. A new cap and spacer from Numrich would look really sharp, I agree. What type of finish would work best after applying whatever stain I decide to employ after stripping?
BB

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There is a screw under the white diamond in the center of the cap. That diamond is a snap in fit. Prying it out to get to the screw, usually buggers it up so you can't reuse it. and they are hard to find if you have to replace it
If you're careful, you can get a pin under the long end of the diamond and pry it up, with very little damage. You decide if it's worth doing it.
Good luck stripping the finish off an 1100. :shock: :shock: Some tough stuff!
 

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It's my understanding that a built up oil finish can provide you with a smooth (no grain pock marks) end result with whatever amount of gloss you choose to bring it to. You can use filler also. I have never tried oil although if I were doing a high end gun I would. I like laquer where the gun will not be routinely exposed to harsh conditions. It's easy to work with, dries fast, and can be had in gloss, semi-gloss, and satin finish. I have used oil based urethanes on field pieces that will be exposed to rain, snow etc.
Takes longer to dry, but much more weather resistant. I am no
'smith but have seen two schools of thought on applying a finish. Completely finish the wood (end grain under the butt plate, inside the inletting, etc.) or allow the wood to breathe through those areas. So far I cannot say that I have seen any difference. I have couple laquer jobs that were done both ways about 5 yrs. ago and they both still look good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys!
Good advice from both of you!
I'm curious Old Ammo. Where do you shoot? Ever frequent Cherry Ridge? Being in the next county over makes me wonder.
Thanks again guys!

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I used to shoot at Cherry Ridge, up until both kids started college.
Then I had to cut back on some of the fun things, as my pockets aren't that deep.
I now shoot there as a guest, when some of my buddies who are members go.
Also shoot at the public range at the Flatbrook and Clinton.
 
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