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I pulled the stock off my old o/u and the trigger group was heavily "gunked" up with years of accumulated oil, grease, powder and dirt. I cleaned it with break free, rem action cleaner and powder blast. It looks like new now. The question is what lube do you like after a deep cleaning like this?
 

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I'm not familiar with "rem action cleaner and powder blast" but I assume both of them are solvents which don't leave any lubricant behind when they dry off. If so, they have stripped every bit of lubricant off the action, and it is now dry and bare, so it needs lubricant at each moving part.

In order to make sure I don't miss any points that need lube, I spray with BreakFree or RemOil - spray thoroughly and get everything wet. However, that will leave an excess of lube, which you need to remove to keep it from soaking into the stock wood (gun oil will ruin wood over a long time). If you have a source of dry compressed air, you may be able to blow the excess off. I use cleaning patches or Rags-In-a-Box to wipe it off. The whole thing may look dry when I finish, but there is still oil on the moving parts.
 

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Mr. Ben,

I take it that you do NOT put a grease on the contract points of the lockwork of your doubles. Do you find a thin film of CLP to be a good lube for contact points inside a double (sears, cocking levers, etc.)?

How may thousands of rounds can you go before relubing with CLP?

Thanks,

20 ga.
 

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20 ga. said:
How may thousands of rounds can you go before relubing with CLP?
I dunno. I shoot my guns a lot - about 20-25,000 rounds a year, I only clean and lube the action about twice a year, and I've never had a problem.

I adopted my lube method from Lawrence Pylinski, a gunsmith who travels in a mobil shop, going to big trap and skeet shoots. He services guns that get shot up to 40,000 rounds a year. He said he sprays with oil and blows off the excess with compressed air.

It would be hard to get grease into all the spots where it is needed - you might miss some. Grease can get stiff in very cold weather and cause malfunctions. Some people who shoot in extremely cold weather strip off all the lubricant and shoot it dry.
 

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MrBen said:
He said he sprays with oil and blows off the excess with compressed air.
That's an excellent way to do it.
I don't have access to compressed air at my house, only at work.
That's why i don't use CLP on trigger groups, it's to messy and runny and thick, rem-oil goes on thin and light, that's what you want for trigger groups.although i do put some shooters choice FP-10 on certain areas of a trigger group.
 

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Ben,

Thanks for the tip. Oils will work fine as they do get everywhere in the action. I suppose that Mr. Pylinski blows the excess off with compressed air because he does not have time to let it drip off overnight. I just let the action sit vertically or hang it up and in a few hours all the excess runs out.

20 ga.
 

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I use compressed air on mine to clean and dry it completely when needed.The thing is that my triggers just don't get that gunked up very often.If I do a regular cleaning on the trigger by wiping the dirty parts and using Q tips to get into the tough spots then I do a major job like that once a year at the most. If you don't have access to a compressor(which is the best tool I ever bought for my shop)you must have a neighbor with one or your local tire shop would probably be willing to help you out for the 2 minutes that it would take.
Dave
 

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It just occured to me that I used to own a portable air tank that I could fill at the service station and it had enough copacity to inflate a pretty good-sized tractor tire. I may still have it around somewhere, if my no-count brother-in-law didn't get ahold of it.

I wonder - could you replace the tire filler valve with a quick-disconnect fitting so you could either fill a tire or use a blow valve (what are those things called?)

Maybe I'll go look for that tank......
 

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Everybody should be using an inline seperator for any compressed air applications.I use my own shop compressor as my air source when painting vehicles and while sandblasting with no problem at all.Moisture content is at a bare minimum.Believe me,a gun is a lot more tolerant to a wee bit of moisture than $500 worth (or more) of automotive paint.If there's moisture in the air supply,the paint will let you know.Besides,my guns have been known to have spent just a wee bit of time in rainstorms that would rival the Indian monsoons.They will survive! :)
Dave
 

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I too use compressed air to clean trigger groups.....often, after a rinse with carb cleaner. I then spray the whole thing with breakfree and blow as much of the breakfree out of it with compressed air. There is a drier in my air lines and no moisture in my compressed air!
 
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