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Whichever one fits you the best. Both should work great for you.
 

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For all around use a lighter to mid weight model that cycles a wide range of loads is usually a good choice.

The 390 has better quality. It's lighter in weight for all day upland hunts. It has a stock heavy balance point to the 11-87's muzzle heavy balance point. The 390 will cycle lighter loads better. The 390 come with shims to adjust the stock for a better fit and have an automatic magazine ccutoff. The 390 only holds four rounds total to the five for the 11-87 and it can take an extension where the 390 can't. They are pretty close as far as ease of cleaning but, the 390 can go way longer between cleanings. The 390 is a little thinner thru the forearm.
 

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Marks

Your question really boils down to what fits you best as well as what your personal preference is...as both guns fit the purpose for which you intend to use them.

As I own both of these guns, I can honestly say that I like the 390 for an all-around general purpose gun over the 11-87.

The 390 has several advantages over the 11-87; like extreme reliabiltiy and all 2&3/4 to 3 inch load interchangeability, shim adjustable stock, lighter weight/better balance, and quick/easy cleaning...although it can go a very, very, very long time between cleanings (and still goes bang with every trigger-pull).

If your budget can only allow one gun, you will not be sorry with the 390...as I have often said, all you have to do is feed it shells and it will run like a 'raped-ape'!!!

Joe
 

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I just want to give you my experience so it may help you. I have always loved Remington products, all of them. I wanted a waterfowl gun, and wanted reliability. So I bought a 11-87 SP in 12gauge 3.5 and though wow the gun of my dreams. It shot fine for about 8 shells then jammed, and jammed about every 10 to 30 shells fire, no matter how clean it was. It became a Jamomattic, and the problem (for you amiture gun smiths that want to say you know why) is it jammed a different way each time, and had no repeatability with the way it jammed, so I knew it would not be fixable in any reasonable way. My buddy bought the same model gun 2 weeks after me and his was worse than mine. We kept them trying to make them work for 8 to 10 months, lost many birds and finally gave up on them. He shoots a bennellie SBE and I shoots the winchester SX3, and its 10X the gun the rem ever could be.
 

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PKomrowski it is too bad you and your friend couldn't correct your guns during the time you had them, but up till now it was about 3" chambered guns.
 

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If I had to sell all my shotguns and keep just one, it would be my Beretta AL390 Silver Mallard. It has become one of my all-time favorite long arms of any type.

Good hunting,
desmobob
 

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I own Benelli's, Beretta's, Winchesters and Remingtons. My 11-87 and 1100 are as good a gun as any of the others and better in some respects. Primarily because with the Remmies I hit what I shoot at because they fits like a glove.

As far as reliability goes.....I keep my guns perfectly clean and lubricated and my Remingtons have never jammed. I've got a LH 1100 that was given to me in 1979 that has digested thousands and thousands of rounds and I don't recall it ever once having a malfunction.

Buy the one that fits you best. Pay little attention to what others like. Don't overlook which one YOU LIKE best. If you don't buy what you like you wont be happy.
 

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I have had both and I still have 2 1100's Both are great guns and will do the job. Both can have broken parts with the rem being easier to get replacement parts/repair as just about every gunsmith has them in stock. I worked at a range for a while they had berettas 302's and rem 1100's. Most people shoot the remington better because of its barrel heavy feel. Look at how skeet shooters add weight to the gun. remington stocks seem a little thinner in the comb. The bottom line is to get whichever one fits you best
 

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I have never owned a 390 but have an 11-87 Premier, 11-87 Sportsman and my grandfather's 1970s era 1100 and love all of them. One of the above posts said the Beretta digests light loads better but my 11-87s do just fine with my 12 gauge 7/8 oz loads. The sporstman is the gun of choice when I take a new shooter to the range and have never had a jam with the light loads. I was wanting to get my son one of the Beretta autos that has a stock spacer that can be removed for small shooters and put back in as he grows up. However, I was in a gun shop a few months ago and happened across a pristine 20 gauge 1100 with an immaculate youth wood stock and couldn't resist. He will be unwrapping it in a few hours and we will be off to the skeet range in the morning. My only experience with teh 390 was a loaner at a sporting clays range this summer. I shot it very well but it felt very different from the Remington, not bad, just different. I don't think you can go wrong with either gun but if at all possible I would try to shoot both before making the decision.
 

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I have never fired a Remington semiautomatic shotgun. I do own a 32-plus-year-old Wingmaster, and for a mass produced, stamped shotgun, it is a work of art. So if Remington's semiautomatics are as well crafted, you could not go wrong with one. My dad used to have a Beretta AL-2, I believe, that was the most reliable semiautomatic shotguns I have ever experienced. He used to tell me of the craftsmanship of his shotgun with which he hunted all feathered game. He harvested his last animal, a pheasant, with it. I am fortunate I was with him and saw him shoot it. So I would recommend either, but if I were pressed to recommend just one it would be Beretta.

Merry Christmas,

Light Twelve
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hey everyone..
I went ahead and bought the AL390 today. A Christmas present to myself. It feels and fits me great. It is very well balanced. I can't wait to shoot some ducks. I have nothing against Remington but the Beretta was 40 dollars cheaper.
Stupid Question... Do I need to clean it before I shoot a few rounds??

Thanks for everyones opinion...and Merry Christmas
Mark
 

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congrats on your buy, i posted the same question on here a few weeks ago. ended up buying the 390, excellent gun. as far as cleaning out of the box, i dont think you need to. i literally pulled mine out of the box and went to the range. i have been cycling on average about 300 rounds a week for the past 3 weeks shooting skeet, and have not had an issue.
 

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mark5740 said:
Hey everyone..
I went ahead and bought the AL390 today....

... Do I need to clean it before I shoot a few rounds??
No, but it wouldn't hurt. I usually completely disassemble, clean and relube a new firearm as a way to get aquainted with it and to be sure no swarf is left in the operating parts.

If that's not your cup of tea, then just shoot it and enjoy!

Merry Christmas,
desmobob
 

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mark5740 - I would be inclined to follow desmobob's advice, and go through the user's manual (if one was not in the box, it can be downloaded) as well as giving the gun a thorough cleaning - just to get acquainted. I once bought a used Remington 1100 and followed this advice only to discover that the original owner had never done so: there was still the original cosmoline anti-rust coating from the factory gumming up the works. Any de-greaser will take care of that; Hoppes will work just fine too. Along this line of thought - be sure the barrel is clear of any grease or oil before firing your gun. The Adventure continues... Shoot Safe, SidelockSxS
 

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I think removal of the packing grease / rust preventative / commonly called cosmoline, is a good idea prior to shooting. I don't think that the new compounds used today by the manufacturers, however, are as heavy as the old ones that definitely had to be removed. So you can probably get away with sneaking in a few first rounds. I would not be surprised though if the gun was a little slow to cycle, with maybe a failure to fully go back into battery if its real cold out. Just don't make any final judgements of the guns reliability until it has been properly cleaned and lubed.

I think when I bought my AL 390 Silver Mallard, and later my AL391 Urika Gold, that the book said cleaning with the Beretta oil provided with the gun was sufficient?

Congratulations on your new gun I sure hope you enjoy it.

Jeff
 
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