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I was just wondering why you all hunt, ie for meat, just for sport or what ?. I've been asked this question myself so I thort I'd ask here.altho I like shooting I generally hunt introduced animals only, this still leaves a lot we can thank the poms for :p (not all of these in the one place) rabbits, hare, five different deer, foxes, pigs, buffalo, wild dogs, lots of different birds and so on.so when I go hunting I generally try to shoot as many of the above as possible as vermin.what about you lot ? :D
 

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The thrill of the chase. Being able to figure out the animal on its own terms and bring them to the gun. That and I enkjoy cooking and eating the meat that hasnt been fed who knows what kind of hormones and stimulants.
 

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i hunt because i enjoy it. i really can't justify it to anyone else.something about it i can't explain. it just makes sense! "The early bird gets the worm ,but it's the second mouse that gets the cheese!"
 

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Friends.The smell of gunpowder in the crisp fall air.That invisible hand that seems to grab a dog by the nose when he gets that first whiff.You're right,it's very hard to explain.I just tried,and failed.But I,and many of my friends,know exactly what you mean. Beside that,another of my addictions is cooking.There's nothing like smoked pheasant stuffed with Cajun cornbread and sausage dressing.It's slowly taking the place of turkey as the favorite Thanksgiving dish around our place. Jim
 

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Like most here I have hard time putting it to words. One of the best explanations I can muster is it takes me back to better times. When I go down home and get out in familiar woods and fields, suddenly I'm 7 years old tagging along with my Dad , some of the only memories I have of him were made in the fields and woods hunting. Other times I'm 15 hunting with my Uncle and Grandpa, both passed on and hunting with Dad in some far away woodlot.Hunting for me, is beyond food, beyond a "Right", it's almost a religious experience. It definately keeps me in touch with my long dead ancestors. When I get out hunting, all the troubles of the world disappear, it is a world where my biggest problem is keeping up with that hard-headed, run-off, flea-bitten ,sorry excuse for a dog that I love hunting with. It's a world where if I want to shoot a flushed bird I pull the trigger, if I don't , I pull up and follow the bird with the barrel, yes, I get dirty looks from the dog for that but he forgives me quickly.Nope I can't adequately explain it.
 

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Why well its in the Kube family blood. My grandparents hunted my dad hunted so i hunt and my kids hunt. I enjoy being out in the outdoors whether I harvest anything or not. Some people say how can you injoy sitting out in 20 degree weather frezzing your butt off. Well I do havnt figured it out yet but i do.HeavyChevyLM NAHCFounding member HHHwww.hhh-usa.org
 

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I think each of us in here could write a book about why we hunt. Although at times, I consider it being "drawn to nature", not necessarily "hunting".I enjoy being outdoors by myself. It gives me time to think, and sometimes more importantly, time to not have to think but rather sit back and enjoy my surroundings. Deer hunting is the bet example of this. I hunt from a treestand and have countless hours each year to sit back and enjoy nature. To sit in the woods alone and never be lonely gives me a feeling of satisfaction. I share a small knob of dry land on the edge of a swampy bog with a pair of ruffed grouse I like to think of as my neighbors, or perhaps more accurately, my landlords. They seem to tolerate my presence quite well and I certainly enjoy when they stop by for a visit in the morning and evening.Black-capped chickadees are also a good source of companionship while in the field. There entertaining and bold presence makes me feel quite welcome and at home amongst nature. And of course, no neighborhood is complete without the nosey, less-than friendly denizens. In my neighborhood, a pair of gray squirrels have adopted that role. Every morning as the woods awakes from it's mock slumber, I am greeted by an angry buck gray squirrel chewing me out for sitting too close to his favorite breakfast nook in the form of a poplar stump.It is easy to answer why I am drawn to nature, but as Marland has suggested, it is much more difficult to answer the question of why I hunt. I find the rush of adrenaline intoxicating at the first flicker of white in the brush, and it's overpowering crescendo as you realize it truly is a deer making it's way through the thicket. Your mind reels with hopes and wishes that it will offer a suitable target. To wait and listen as it meanders so painfully slowly, pausing to smell and listen, fills your lungs with excruciatingly painful breaths of air as your heart pounds in your chest and you must swallow for fear of it escaping right out of your throat.Anyone who has hunted ruffed grouse can attest that you cannot measure success by how many birds you take that season, but by how many you flush. And the powerful flushes that both startle and excite you to a frenzy of panic that you cannot even find the trigger of your trusty shotgun stay with you and become so deeply etched as to stay with you for a lifetime. They rise again to the surface on warm evenings as you hear drumming in the distance, and the smile returns to your face and the wonder and awe is still there so fresh and distinct as the day you flushed the very grouse that may be drumming. Perhaps he is taunting you - asking you to come play in his home field, and by his rules once again, and you swear that during the next season you will meet again, and no matter what the outcome, no matter which one is victorious at the end of the day you can't help but feel the mutual respect. It would seem you both know the possibilities of outcome at the onset of such an engagement, and are willing to accept the consequences.I feel pity for those who do not, can not, and saddest of all will not understand these feelings. And only those who respect their quarry and admire it and love it can understand why we hunt. I guess that is what differentiates those of us who hunt from those who don't. I will admit that at times it IS about the kill. If it weren't I would be an observer not a hunter.Here is one of my favorite quotes. It is from "The Grouse Hunter's Guide", by Dennis Walrod, Stackpole Books, 0-8117-0772-5:"We like to kill grouse. Now...isn't that a strange thing to say? In print, those words seem to convey a certain ruthlessness, a disdain for wildlife. And yet we truly care for our noble quarry. At the instant of the kill, the hunter and the gun and the grouse combine to become one. Form follows function, and during that brief moment of interconnected violence, it seems impossible that we might ever have missed the target. The cycle of planning, hunting, finding, and gathering-in is completed and started over when a grouse plummets to earth, and we feel a sense of renewal.The grouse, of course, dies, and there's the rub, the dark question mark that causes us to ask whether we really have a moral right to hunt the ruffed grouse with intent to kill. We stand holding the limp form of a ruffed grouse in hand, pondering (as we always do) the perfection in the feathered patterns, and wish however momentarily that a quick toss upward could restore the now-quieted thunder. But then pride of achievement takes ahold of us. The ruffed grouse is a worthy gamebird, and it's not really all that often that we get to hold one, to possess it and know that our skills afield have shown a tangible payoff."-Amen Mike RossThe Cartridge GuysLife Member, North American Hunting ClubMember, National Rifle AssociationMember, Meeker Co. Historical Society
 

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I enjoy being in the outdoors. Being in the woods in the early morning, listening to the birds and squirell become active. In the winter I have even heard the snowflakes landing on my jacket. Just a wonderful feeling.Besides a gun and hunting license is a socially acceptable reason to be in the woods sitting perfectly still when its 15 degrees outside (deer season). Without those, folks would think you are crazy. :D WARNING: Do not look into laser with remaining eye!
 
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You have all said it very well. It takes you back. If you are young and do not have much "back" then, don't worry, you will understand in 30 years. It is one thing I can count on for seeing my buddies and catching up on what's up. We walk and walk and talk and talk. If we get birds that is great, if not, that is great too.

And then the kids start growing up and coming along. You get a chance to really know them as you watch them hunt and shoot and tell you about their short little lives. Each year they are a foot taller and more of a man.

Hunting causes bonding. Bonding with your family, friends, your old hound and the crafty quarry you seek.

Dang I am glad I am a hunter !!!!
 

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those all sound like decent reasons. I just wish I could get my girlfriend to accept hunting :( . She says she doesn't like it because it's "taking pleasure" in killing an animal. I try to turn it around and ask her if she takes pleasure when she eats a good steak, saying that morally that's no different, because she's still taking pleasure in the animal's death, but I just can't convince her. I've even gotten her to admit that it's not that much different than fishing (which she's done a few times and liked), but still no dice. Anybody have any suggestions?
 

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nick said:
those all sound like decent reasons. I just wish I could get my girlfriend to accept hunting :( . She says she doesn't like it because it's "taking pleasure" in killing an animal. I try to turn it around and ask her if she takes pleasure when she eats a good steak, saying that morally that's no different, because she's still taking pleasure in the animal's death, but I just can't convince her. I've even gotten her to admit that it's not that much different than fishing (which she's done a few times and liked), but still no dice. Anybody have any suggestions?
Oh brother, I feel your pain!

I have a wife and 3 daughters that share your girlfriends views. I had a son who hunted but he lost a tough battle with drugs. All of my daughters were curious about the game we would bring home and would run to see the "catch". Now they all make a face and run away. Their ages are 21, 19, and 11. The 11 year old still likes to see what I bring home but she is starting to make that face after she checks out the kill.

Suggestions?

Buy a skeet launcher and let her shoot some clays. Don't get a hand launcher. Buy one that mounts to a spare tire and take turns shooting. I have taken wifey and the 3 daughters shooting (not at the same time, a root canal would be more fun :D ) and they had a good time.

Explain to her that she is a hunter. Yep, that's right. She is. Teach her the difference between the skulls of the hunter and hunted. Use a rabbit and a fox as an example. Show her how a rabbit's eyes are set off to the side so that it can spot a hunter (the fox) over a wider area. Then show her how the fox's eyes are set forward in the skull, just like a human's, to hunt by sight more efficiently.

If this doesn't work, take her out on Friday night. Go to a movie or a club, whatever it is you like to do together. Have a nice dinner. Bring her home at a respectable hour. Get up nice and early Saturday morning and GO HUNTING :lol:
 

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Nick, take this sage advice from an old hand for what it's worth. You might as well choose right now. Her or hunting. IF things progress on to matrimoney, and she's not understanding and supportive of your hunting ,your life will be hell.

You will never have time to hunt, she'll see to that.

Your kids won't be allowed to go out hunting with you.

Do not accept " I guess it's ok " as a position on hunting.

Like I said, take it for what it's worth, but history has proven changing someone is difficult.

How does she feel about guns in general?
 
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