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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm sure some you guys are going to think this is a dumb question, but I have to ask because I've never had one. I also had a guy in the dove field the other day who swore that the older Wingmasters do not kick like the Express models.

I have 870 Express time 3. All kick very good....just like an 870 should. But, I was thinking of finding a used Wingmaster because I've always wanted one. So, for those of you who have actually compared the two, is there a recoil difference between the older Wingmasters (15 years or older) and the newer 870 Express models?

thanks, jed
 

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Horse Hockey!
Recoil is a result of the mass of the payload, the powder charge, and the weight of the gun.

In other words if the Wingmaster and the Express weigh the same, and given similar stocks, i.e. both wood, or both synthetic they should be very close, and using the same ammo in both there would be no difference in recoil.

Perceived recoil is a bit different. Same story, if you are shooting a Remington 1100, and a Wingmaster, and they weigh the same the recoil is the same. However, because of the gas system, the 1100 will give the perception of less recoil than the Wingmaster, because the recoil is spread out over time as several pulses.

Also, if the butt plate is much larger on one gun than the other, everything else being equal, the recoil will be the same, but the perceived recoil will be more on the gun that presents less surface area to the shoulder.

Go for a used Wingmaster, because they are really great shotguns. Especially if you can find one that is in really nice shape. However, difference in recoil...I'll bet if blindfolded you couldn't tell the difference between a Wingmaster and an Express. I mean, actually they are the same gun except for a few parts and the finish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Snarlingiron said:
Horse Hockey!
Recoil is a result of the mass of the payload, the powder charge, and the weight of the gun.

In other words if the Wingmaster and the Express weigh the same, and given similar stocks, i.e. both wood, or both synthetic they should be very close, and using the same ammo in both there would be no difference in recoil.

Perceived recoil is a bit different. Same story, if you are shooting a Remington 1100, and a Wingmaster, and they weigh the same the recoil is the same. However, because of the gas system, the 1100 will give the perception of less recoil than the Wingmaster, because the recoil is spread out over time as several pulses.

Also, if the butt plate is much larger on one gun than the other, everything else being equal, the recoil will be the same, but the perceived recoil will be more on the gun that presents less surface area to the shoulder.

Go for a used Wingmaster, because they are really great shotguns. Especially if you can find one that is in really nice shape. However, difference in recoil...I'll bet if blindfolded you couldn't tell the difference between a Wingmaster and an Express. I mean, actually they are the same gun except for a few parts and the finish.
I agree mostly with what you said, but that's just it--they don't weigh the same (the old ones at least), nor is the wood/material the same. I know they're probably built in the same place (factory), but there has to be a separate assemby line for the Wingmaster. The internal parts may be same, but the rest of the two guns are different, especially the old ones. That's why I asked for information from people actually own one of each and have shot them extensively.

Example: was on a dove hunt the other day with my brother-in-law who was shooting a 20 year old Wingmaster 28" 12 ga. He is a little guy--about 160 or so. His son's gun broke so he gave him his Wingmaster. He then borrowed my new 870 Express. He gave it back after shooting it a few times and said "that things kicks like a horse." I did not compare the two at the time, but I figure he noticed a difference of some kind.

Thanks for your response.

jed
 

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I do own both, but my Wingmaster is a 20 ga., and my 2 Express models are both 12 ga. so I can't make a real side by side comparison. However, I have shot many many different shotguns in all gages and of all designs over the last 45 years, and I'll be darned if I can see a great deal of difference in recoil between them, given same gage, same ammo, etc. I mean if I am shooting x ammo in a 12 ga., I can tell precious little difference between let's say, this pump, that pump, an O/U, a SxS, etc. Now, with a gas operated gun I will be able to tell a bit of difference.

Maybe I'm just an insensitive clod, but I would be very surprised indeed if I could tell the difference.

Hopefully, someone with both will chime in. I'm curious too, now.
 

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OK, here goes. I have a 1968 20 gauge Wingmaster. Of course, it's the standardweight as the lightweight version had not been made yet. I've owned an 870 Express, also a 20 gauge. The Wingmaster weighs a bit more than 6 1/2 lbs and the Express just a bit less than 6 1/2 lbs. Both had the same length of pull and approximately the same drop at comb and heel. Both were outfitted with similar recoil pads. I shot the same loads through both guns and the felt recoil was about the same. I know the physics of the experiement, if properly instrumented, would show the Wingmaster to recoil less due to its greater weight. However, the difference was so slight that I couldn't REALLY feel it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Mustangdriver said:
OK, here goes. I have a 1968 20 gauge Wingmaster. Of course, it's the standardweight as the lightweight version had not been made yet. I've owned an 870 Express, also a 20 gauge. The Wingmaster weighs a bit more than 6 1/2 lbs and the Express just a bit less than 6 1/2 lbs. Both had the same length of pull and approximately the same drop at comb and heel. Both were outfitted with similar recoil pads. I shot the same loads through both guns and the felt recoil was about the same. I know the physics of the experiement, if properly instrumented, would show the Wingmaster to recoil less due to its greater weight. However, the difference was so slight that I couldn't REALLY feel it.
Thanks. That is exactly what I was looking for.

jed
 

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I think the key here is "I have owned" an 870 express...Like me, I owned a 870 express for about 12 hrs before I returned it to the store and he re-sold it later that day...So, U rather like them OR U don't, for whatever reason...I don't, as they are not the original 2 3/4", slick actioned, nicely finished Wingmaster, an excellent field gun !! But IM cool like that... :twisted:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Bodine said:
I think the key here is "I have owned" an 870 express...Like me, I owned a 870 express for about 12 hrs before I returned it to the store and he re-sold it later that day...So, U rather like them OR U don't, for whatever reason...I don't, as they are not the original 2 3/4", slick actioned, nicely finished Wingmaster, an excellent field gun !! But IM cool like that... :twisted:
You are right. There is a hugh difference. I plan on buying one this weekend, so I can make a side-by-side comparison.

jed
 
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