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I there a powder that preforms better in the winter than others? I am talking 1 and 1 1/8 oz trap loads.
 

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LET'S OPEN A HORNETS NEST----I would use a faster burning powder-I won't list names-you can figure this out by less powder charge vs a whole bunch 8) I am guessing you are 12 ga shooter??? In all fairness with a large gauge you will see little to no difference-a few hundred fps-in EXTREME cold-The smaller the ga. the bigger the difference ---2400 vs 410 :wink: :wink: :wink:
 

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Yes, lets. I've had off sounding loads from Clays/700X and Nitro 100 in temps down near 0º to 10º. I've never had a single problem with two powders, PB and Trap 100, T100 is no longer made so that leaves PB..

This place is about opinions, my opinion is based on experience----and not just internet experience.

I'll give you another hive to open, in loading 12 gauge 3/4 oz loads I tried 6 different propellants, PB was the leader in every form except expense in those loads.
 

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Texas Tom -do you shoot 20 or 28???? MY BEST ARE - 20 International and 28 -Universal -I am with you on the 12 what Very little I shoot-it hammers me anymore :oops: :oops: I am shooting a BrowningXSUltra 410 w/28 's -with great results-I n the future may go back to the 20?
 

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TexasTon said:
I'll give you another hive to open, in loading 12 gauge 3/4 oz loads I tried 6 different propellants, PB was the leader in every form except expense in those loads.
What would be your next 2 or 3 favorites after PB for 3/4 oz loads in the 12 ga?
 

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I have no experience with REX powders, but I have with BE, between it and 700 it is by far, better suited to cold temps.

BE is a good little powder, it just has no/zero elasticity or cushion for mistakes. I've used it in 7/8 and 1 ounce loads, by the book, works great and is cleaner than the "dot" powders. But I would send prospective loads off to test for pressure just in case.

Downside is, you have to let the bar sit for a second under the powder bottle to get accurate charges, it doesn't meter very well without extra care.
 

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Easy solution: Keep your shells warm and use the same powder that you like to shoot in the summer. Dont leave shells overnight inthe trunk of your car before you go shooting, take them inside the clubhouse when you are shooting and only put what you will need in your pocket--a hand warmer helps keep them warm while in your pocket and does wonders for your fingers too.
 

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I'm in Minnesota -- probably the best proving ground in the world for anything to do with cold weather. I hate it here, I'd like to leave, I can't stand it anymore; how the hell do you become a good shooter in this sort of climate... :evil:

Oh oh, I see I've drifted off the point a bit. Anyway, it seems to me that the wad used is more critical than anything else. I continue to load 12 gauge, 1 1/8 oz. loads with International Clays (a little slower powder) even in the winter. I've had trouble (light report, lots of unburned powder in the barrel) using the PC Post wad (the new ones) and a friend has had trouble with Windjammers. But, I've never had any problems when using Winchester WAA12's, even with the slow powder. I suppose wad manufacturers try to build product for use in extreme climates, however, no one who doesn't live here can even imagine what hell the Minnesota winter truly is!
 

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I shoot mostly 12g in the winter, and it gets REALLY cold here. From my experience:
1. You're most likely to encounter problems with low pressure loads.
2. Use the hottest primer available, I'd suggest Fed. 209A's if you have data for them.
3. Stay away from claybuster wads.
 

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driller said:
Easy solution: Keep your shells warm and use the same powder that you like to shoot in the summer. Dont leave shells overnight inthe trunk of your car before you go shooting, take them inside the clubhouse when you are shooting and only put what you will need in your pocket--a hand warmer helps keep them warm while in your pocket and does wonders for your fingers too.
How do you keep your shells warm when they're in the chamber of your gun for a couple hours? Or are you that good that you can load 3 shells silently when your quarry approaches? :p

Mike Doerner
 

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LOL---NO I am not so good as to load 3 shells in the gun while my quarry approaches. I gave up hunting in really cold weather many years ago. About the only time I shoot in the COLD is at a trapshoot in the winter.
 

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Leaveing up here in the Great White North we get some extremely cold days and alot of them just happen to be shoot days. I dont bother changeing powders from summer to winter. I do however do a few thing different than in the summer.

1) up my wad pressure 10lbs....I dont know if this actually does anything because I dont have a pressure tester but I think it helps seal the shell better. I normaly load so that the pressure ***** just moves but in the winter I go up to 35lbs.

2)Dont load any questionable hulls. I save all my old junk hulls and use them up in the summer. During the winter I load mostly once or twice fired hulls. They get a better crimp and when useing 7/8oz and 1oz 12ga loads which are already low pressure the good crimps help with consistancy.

3) I go to a mag primer. Normally a CCI209M I found that this really mkaes a big difference to load consistancy.

4) Shoot an original or top quality clone wad. I shoot alot of Claybusters in the summer but when the temps start getting down below freezeing they go away till the weather warms again. I use either an original Windjammer or a GreenDuster. I've had better results with the Duster wads in the cold than the Winchester WAA12SL

I know some guys that shoot very light 7/8oz loads that just end up going one powder bushing higher for the winter. That gets the job done for the most part but they still have the a odd "ploopy" sounding shell.
Steps 1-4 have kept me happy over the years. One other thing I might mention. When looking for load for the powders that you already have look for ones with pressures that are over 9,000psi. Thats usually a good point aslong as your useing a good wad.

Tim
 

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I've got a bunch of one ounce loads loaded with Rex II. By all accounts they shouldn't even fire in really cold weather but they seem to work fairly well.

I don't shoot a lot in relly cold weather. More often than not I'm shooting 1300fps, 1 1/4 oz loads loaded with WSF. They work great.
 
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