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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've posted it in "restoration" too
I am thinking of refinishing a stock, I've never done that before and need an advice.
Could you please comment on my options?

1. TRU-OIL Gun Stock Finish (good protection, but glossy[?])
2. LIN-SPEED (good protection?, not too glossy[?])
3. Dem-Bart Continental-Style Stock and Checkering Oil ([?], [?], easy to use[?])
4.Just put some wax type of thing on the wood?

What would you use to seal the "inside"?

I've just bought new Yildiz, really like how it shoots and feels, but I am concerned it won't last me long with the finish it has on the wood (it feels like an oil finish of some kind, but somewhat dry, and I can see pores if I look close).
My main goal is to protect wood from water, but I would like to avoid high-gloss type of finish too, just don't like it.
Do I just worry too much? Had a cracked stock on the gun I got from my dad before.
 

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My Yildiz dealer up here in Canada told me all his guns were being shipped pre-treated with Linseed oil. That is what Yildiz has instructed him to continue treating the stocks with.

I agree that this finish doesn't seem durable, and needs to be continually mantained. Other people notice that my gun has a "smell" to it from the oil, and a bit of a greasy finish at times.

I am considering the TruOil idea.
 

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I don't consider myself a wood expert, but I have made a couple of stocks and refinished a few more. Linseed oil is not the best finish for protection, but is not bad if either maintained or waxed with something. Bees wax rubbed on top of it is not a bad idea. I felt my stock was not sufficiently oiled enough to fill the pores, so I oiled it some more. I know where a store in Austin sells a old-time linseed oil/ beeswax mixture. With this stuff, you dab your finger in the can and rub that small amount into the wood. A little goes a long way. This way it dries pretty quickly too. It takes a couple to a few coats of this stuff to make the protection a lot better and it does not make the wood glossy. Tongue oil is a better protectant and can be applied without making the stock glossy too. There are many tongue oil products. I like a brand made by Watco. You can get it with a little color in it as well, if you wish to darken the stock. Watco also makes a wax that is liquid and can be applied over the finished wood. The cool part about this wax is you can apply more Watco oil on the waxed wood at a later date. It dissolves the wax and oils the wood. ( You then have to wax it again if yo want it waxed.) Tru-oil is easy to apply, but is a very modern looking gloss finish. It will protect the wood quite well. If you want to be "schooled" on finishing stocks, search the internet for a guy named cabinetmaker. He refinished military surplus stocks and has a lot of how-to's on a couple of rifle boards. I have never read anything he said about finishing wood that in my limited experience wasn't absolutely true.
 

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TruOil is the way to go. Easy to apply like Tom said. You can get the amount of gloss with TruOil that you want by what ever you use to buff it out with. If you want a dull finish, use a coarser grain of steel wood. I like the semi gloss look which to me duplicates the finish on fine firearms. Its been a long time since I did a TruOil job and if I remember right, the way I did it was several coats of T-O steel wooling it between coats. The final coat was steel wooled with very very fine steel wool then I used Dupont polishing compound to buff it out to that fine sheen which is inbetween a high gloss and non gloss finish...or semi gloss.
Chris
 

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Jason,
I don't know for sure but I wouldn't hesitate trying it. If you want just try it in a small spot near the recoil pad. I would steel wool the stock first then apply the T/O with your fingers. Remember, to get the right look, it will take at least 4 coats of T/O. You should be able to tell from the first coat if there is any checking.
Chris
 

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I can't speak about putting TruOil over a freshly oiled linseed oiled stock, but I have put it over previously oiled wood without a problem. Like Chris says you can take a lot of the shine out of out of the finish with steel wool when done. Steel wooling in-between coats takes out the nasty little bumps that sometimes form, too. I don't think you will have a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you, guys for your replies.
I really value them, but guess I am just not ready for TruOil.
After visiting local gun shop and looking on stocks of used guns again I went with Watco oil for now, most have smooth, but very "cold" surfaces.
I couldn't find any tung oil they make (even in WWW) - just "Danish" and "Teak" oils - both seem to be linseed based products, very similar with "Teak" having some UV protectants and such, some people say it's thinner too. Applied 2 "coats" - wood just sucked them in going from dull all dark to "walnut texture" color (I plan on doing it for a while). I had already ordered some "'GB' LIN-SPEED" - but I am not sure I' ll use it now. May just go with Watco wax. I am going to seal "the inside part" with some sealer of the same brand T/O is maybe cut "LIN-SPEED" too and looks like it's the main "moisture weak" part right now, looks just like bare wood.
Thanks again
 

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I've done more than a few gun-stocks and have learned the hard way.

1. Linseed oil must be removed from the surface with acetone before applying Tru-oil. It doesn't take much effort, or rubbing, and it will lighten the wood color some; however, it brings out more of the natural beauty of the wood grain in my experience.

2. Apply Tru-oil sparingly.....and I mean sparingly. Do not use more than a few drops at a time. The best results will be had by applying a thin coat with the palm of your hand and stopping before it begins to get tacky. Once that happens......you've gone past the point of no return. You will get streaks and will have to re-sand the stock once that thick gooey coat dries. You should coat the wood and be done in less than two or three minutes for each piece.....(the butt and the forearm). Tru-oil gets tacky real quickly...so work expediently, but carefully. Rub a few drops into an area and then begin to wipe with the palm of your hand in one direction only. Go with the grain. And go easy on the checkering guys...you only need to rub in enough to make it shine and then no more coats on the checkering. Usually one application on the checkering is sufficient.

3. Tru-oil has a hardener to activate the acrylic polymer. This will evaporate faster than drop of water on a hot skillet if you leave the cap off for even a short time. Even closed....the air between the top of the fluid level and the top of the bottle will cause a build up of "crusty crap" near the top of the bottle and around the cap threads. (That's your hardener....gone "bye-bye" around the cap.) To prevent this, pour out a tiny amount into a small plastic cup and use that for your application. Now.... before you place that cap back on; simply drop a glass marble or two into the bottle of Tru-oil to raise the fluid level back to the top of the bottle at all times. You may have some over spill when you twist that cap back on, but it's better than having Tru-oil that won't harden. Just ask any gunsmith.....they will tell you the same thing. This trick prevents the hardener from collecting around the rim of the bottle and forming "Crispy-Critters". If that happens, you may not even be able to open the bottle back up. The cap may very well become a permanent and immovable fixture. (I had to toss away more than a few bottles before I learned.)

4. Do not over do it with the coats. Go easy and use thin coats, applied quickly and smoothly with the palm of your hand......then wait and do it again the next day. After four coats you will have a finish that rivals any factory finish out there.....even B guns.
Oh.....one other thing.... the drying process; don't try to speed up the drying process with a heat gun or a hair dyer. You'll just evaporate the hardener and end up with a sticky mess.

5. Last...but the most important tip for Tru-oil is......ready?.......NO RUNS! If you get even one run; you've just screwed the pooch. That run will form a drop that is hard on the outside and soft on the inside. When you go to sand it out.....you will end up with a small crater. Then you're back to square one and will have to re-sand and feather-sand to get it right. More often than not, you will end up with a low spot from where you had to sand out that tiny pit. So go REAL EASY with the coats. I mean thin....and I'm serious. Use a sanding block if you goof up. This will help you to keep an even surface. If you try to use just sandpaper with the fingers that God gave you, you will end up with little troughs and dips that won't be immediately visible........ and well........then it's too late.

Hope this helps,
Tank

PS: Ask Fish about Tru-oil.....he will tell you the same thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I am done. Probably not the right way to do it, but I like the result so far.
After I put 3 coats of Watco "Teak oil" and it all went into the wood I switched to linseed and bee wax and put another 4 coats.
Really like the result, wood doesn't have "dry" feel any more, but surface is solid, not "oily".
Wood looks very nice doesn't look "flat" anymore (Yildiz got some compliments on it's wood at the range this weekend).
Since both are linseed products I hope I won't get them reacting with each other, but if I did this again I would start with "Tried and True" Original Wood Finish.
Thanks for advice, Tbaus!
PS I also sealed all inside wood with a sealer of TruOil brand. Very thin not to screw up metal-wood fit
 

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I have just started doing a hand rubbed oil finish on my Y-gun. To me the stock wood looked like plastic and had very little detail to it. Not anymore! I have 3 coats of at least 11 (I saw the following on another post "once a day for a week, once a week for a month, once a month for a year and once a year for a lifetime.", and am going to follow that logic.) and could not be happier. Here is how I have done it so far:

I sanded it with 150 grit in order to get the shiny spots off of the stock from the plastic packaging. Then I coated with a heavy coat of boiled linseed oil and let that set for 30 minutes. Wiped off the excess and then rubbed with my hand or a piece of leather.

Day 2: Coated and used 400 grit to wet sand the stock. Then used fingers and palm to rub the oil into the stock. Used palm, and thumb on smaller areas, to rub the stock until it was hot then moved onto another area.

Day 3: I used very fine steel wool and rubbed the entire surface area down several times. Then I oiled it liberally and let it set for a little while. Then I rubbed it in until either the stock had absorbed all of the oil, or my hands had absorbed some of it too! Then I did the same rubbing method to get the stock hot like I have read in other posts.

Does anyone know if this is correct? Even if it is not, it still looks alot better, but I would like to know how to do it the correct way.
 

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twostepct,

Sounds to me like you're doing it right. I would love to see the finished fruits of your labor.

You'll be happy with the linseed oil finish. My Grandpa used it religiously and his guns always looked "Top 'O the Line". His guns always seemed to resist scratches too. What you're describing seems pretty much like what I remember him doing…..I've never done it myself; only watched Grandpa do it…..and please note that we were just little kids back then; in the Jurassic Period.

Does anyone know if Linseed Oil is a good scratch protectant? Or if it fills in scratches?
(Hmmmm?….must be….Grandpa's guns always looked good…..Even with us kids always knocking 'em around in the woods.) Maybe his maintenance with Linseed Oil took out the scratches? …I don't know…..I do know that he was doing something right.

My nephew ended up with Gramp's old 20gauge Savage, purchased from the local Western-Auto Store. (Guess I'm showing my age, huh?) The first thing I remember Grandpa doing with that gun was stripping the finish and getting out the Linseed Oil. Anyway; my point is that, us kids dragged that old 20gauge through briars, creeks, and thickets for many a year and it still looks good today. But remember this….Grandpa always slicked it down with Linseed oil.

There is always a logical reason for old fashioned tried and true methods.

POST SOME PICS…….We're all twitching in anticipation.

Tank
 

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A properly applied oil finish will resist scratches because the oil soaks into the wood. The finish is not just sitting on top of the wood like many finishes. I have a black powder rifle that was made somewhere in the 1840's and a couple of Trap Door Springfields made in the 1870's that were oil finished. The finish looks good today. Compare that with some rifles made in the 1960's by Savage and others that put some sort of a varnish finish on that is flaking off looking really sad. I just worked on a Remington 788 that other than the flaking wood finish looks like a nice gun. Another good thing about an oil finish is also the fact that it is easily touched up. I can't speak badly about the finish on my Browning A5's. I assume it is a polyurathane. It looks like a glass coating and is beautiful. I have never subjected that finish to any abuse, so I do not know how it would hold up. Be well...
 

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ak-71, Thanks for starting the thread and thanks to all the folks that have provided expert advice. After reading this thread today, I stopped on the way home and examined my "oil" options at Home Depot. I settled on Minwax Tung Oil. No particular reason for choosing this one, other than it sounded easy to apply.

I sanded the wood with 0000 steel wool and brushed on the oil. Let it sit for about 10 minutes and buffed with clean dry cloth...WOW! Now this is more like it. I took before and after pics (wish I knew how to post pics on this forum). When I took pics with the original finish, it looked dry and dull...no glare from the camera's flash. After the first coat of oil and buffing, I had to hold the camera at an angle to keep the flash from glaring in the pic. It's not a gloss finish like my Rem 25-06 BDL, but it looks "healthy" now.

I'll wait 24 hours and do another coat tomorrow night...Sunday I'm going to go shooting after Church...can't wait!!!!
 

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Okay guys.....Seems that we've had more than a few requests for pictures on this forum.

I finally figured out how to do it.....unfortunately; we need a URL with a server......So.....here's what we are going to do.

Since I own a couple of small businesses I can load the pictures on my web-servers and then post them here.

twostepct and SAX.....if you guys will email me your photos I'll be glad to place them right here on this page. That goes for everyone else also.

They need to be saved as a GIF image and try to keep them around 50kb if you can. If you go over that size limit I think I can still make it work as long as they aren't whopper sized pics.

Refinishing tips are a bit disappointing without some photos to go along with the topic......So.....Just send me a personal email from Shotgun World and we'll get the ball rolling with these pictures.

I think we will have some type of size limits so let's try "two at a time".

Sound okay with you guys?

I'll go first…..give me a minute or two and I'll have some pictures posted on a gun that I just finished.

Tank
 

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Ok guys here we go......

These are shots of another IZH-27 that I just completed. You can see what I mean about the Acetone lightening the wood a bit. I've discovered that most walnut has some nice Tiger Striping in there somewhere. If you just work the wood you'll find it.

This particular gun came to me with a dark walnut, Plain-Jane finish. You could barely make out the grain when I purchased this firearm. I'm talking dark brown and boring. I just had to do something.



I do like the glass effect that Tru-Oil delivers. This project was a four coat process as described in my previous post.

Hope you guys like it.

Send your pictures so we can all see the results of your projects.

Tank
 

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Well guys.....I was right about the two picture post. And keep 'em around 50kb or they will just get kicked out.

Here's two more pics of the same project. When you compare these photos with the ones above; You can see how light plays with the wood grain depending on the angle. The glass finish is my favorite in sunlight.



Tank
 

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Very nice Tankerdog! You can really see the grain in your stocks and the finish looks great. I look forward to seeing more pictures. While we are posting pics, I would like to see a pic of the two piece barrel selector/safety that Chris talks about if anyone has pics. Once again, thanks for giving us the webserver space for pics Tankerdog....
 
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